June 10, 2012

June in Blighty

June.

Flaming? Hardly.

The jubilee celebrations were a nationwide exercise in British stiff upper lip and stoic "bunting or die" mentality as thousands of people street partied in downpours, the wind howled and the Queen braved the gunmetal grey Thames with such physical fortitude I spent the entire day fervently hoping she had cashmere thermals on. I watched the flottila on the sofa on under a duvet, such was the cold, and my more adventurous parents  watched the rain bounce off the shoulders of hordes of people infront of them on a London bridge, and hardly saw the boats at all, but saw enough soggy flags and weeping toddlers to last a lifetime. To be British, it seemed last weekend, one required an ability to wave flags in the rain and to staunchly defy a gale with humour, tressle tables and bunting.  There was a genuine and rather touching sense of gratitude and goodwill towards the monarch, who has weathered a few storms of her own over the years and has never, ever flinched from duty.  The pyrotechnics at the Jubilee concert were a personal highlight - only in Blighty would there be Madness singing "Our House" wonkily on the roof of Buckingham Palace, whilst the sparkies managed to project images of the nation's houses on the royal residence facade. Did you see it? Sublimely barmy but fabulous, no?  Her Maj looked on slightly bemused.

We celebrated with paper chains and union jacks at the home of my parents-in-law, with lots of delicious food and fizz and best of all a re-union of the entire family that is usually fairly widespread across the British Isles.


my fab sisters-in-law


jubilee cupcakes made by my daughter

afternoon tea

lunch
But this morning, the sun decided to shine for an hour or two, and the garden was the place to be, the birds were singing their hearts out and the bees buzzing. My garden always goes a bit 'woo-woo' in June, falling over itself to flower madly in every direction, self-seeded annuals bursting into flower amongst the perennial stalwarts. It was lush, I was in heaven.

In the sunny spots of the main borders there is a rampage of delphiniums, artemesia, euphorbia, hesperis, orlaya, lupins and nigella, salvia, Lady's Mantle, alliums and drifts of ornamental grasses,

delphiniums with artemesia 'Powis Castle' behind - love that combo



zingy Lady's Mantle and Salvias, with napeta behind

euphorbia and hesperis 'matronalis'

orlaya grandiflora


Briza maxima

geranium

hesperis


allium christophii with a nigella bloom as hair accessory!

perennial poppy, (gorgeous but oh so floppy!)



aquilegia


- all thoroughly recommended if you like a glorious blast of purple, white and lime green in your early summer garden, and all but the geranium and poppies are crazily wonderful as cut flowers. They all relish a bit of sun, next post I promise a collection that flourish in shadier spots.

Have a lovely week ahead, and wish me luck as a jewellery making vortex may require some heavy- duty hammock therapy by July! xx

20 comments:

  1. Have thoroughly enjoyed your Jubilee this past week. Watched the concert - well, an edited two-hour version - last night and loved the fireworks and the light show on the palace. We don't want a monarch of our own, but we certainly enjoy yours! And, personally, I do admire the Queen. Sixty years is a long time to endure the slings and arrows and ill-behavior of one's family!

    Your garden is lovely - no news there! Am enjoying my small version of it this year, but have just realized that our season started so much earlier that you have lots more variety in bloom at the same time. Makes for a much nicer "display". Happy week!

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    1. It might be worth considering some tough ole prairie style plants that would suit your long hot summers? I"m thinking of those ones that Piet Oudolf uses - echinacea, grasses, achillea etc - mixed in with the annuals to provide prolonged colour?? I am naturally rather anglo-centric since I have to get on and deal with our wet, cool summers but there are benefits of slow-mo longevity of blooms which I am glad for. I love the learning curve of making a garden, non? :)

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  2. Oh my goodness, that poppy is just gorgeous. As always your post has inspired me. Thank you x

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    1. Pleasure. That poppy is def worth all the flopping about it does!

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  3. Gorgeous gardens and photos. Must try the pretty pink aquilegia

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    1. It is v well behaved and doesn't rampage around like some of the others!

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  4. What a nice celebration. So much fun. Congratulations.

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  5. Your flowers look beautiful, I'm swooning over the aquileigia, and your jubilee celebration looks like tremendous fun. Your daughter's cupcakes are perfect!

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  6. Enjoyed the garden photos. I love to do that as well. Check out my latest from an iris gardens here in Oregon:
    http://poetrose24.blogspot.com/

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    1. will do! welcome if this is your first visit to Wild Acre!

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  8. What a fabulous summary of the Jubilee weekend. It was a truly British affair! Your flower garden is looking stunning - did you photo it before the storms this past week - or did you manage to escape the weather? Many gardens in the South seem to have been flattened. That poppy is majestic!

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    1. A few patches got rather squashed - bronze fennel and nigella mainly but got off quite lightly somehow.

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  9. Hi Belinda, enjoying your garden and would appreciate advice on creating a cutting patch on an allotment site that is exposed, a post about this would be great.
    As usual amazing photography!

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  10. Your garden looks sensational, we've had no sun here in the south, all my grasses and delicate flowers are rain sodden and defeated by everything June has so far flung at it. I hope there's sun to come.

    I felt the same about Her Majesty too, cashmere must surely have been worn, but even if it was, she is made of stern stuff. She showed us all the meaning of the word stoical.

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  11. haha you are so right with your decription of the jubilee. I LOVED Madness on the roof!! your afternooon tea looks fab

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  12. Looks like you had a lovely Jubilee weekend. Fab photos! Didn't Izzi make lovely cupcakes - they look delicious. I had huge plans to bake for the bank holiday weekend but when it came to it I could not be bovvered. Ha! Lazy me.

    My plants are taking a million years to grow so I expect a single posy from my cutting patch round about mid-October. Boo. Cannot wait to start it properly this Autumn, am writing notes already for the things I need to do and plant.

    Have a good week at the jewellery bench. Love the latest additions, by the way!!

    Nicki xx

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    1. Nicki, it has been the worst spring for germination, some pro growers I know have talked about the lowest ever rate, so you are not alone, just really bad luck for your first year. We'll chat in August about annuals you can plant in september and those bulbs should be pretty failsafe. xx

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  13. Belinda.good lord just signing in before I collect Kids from school. Have to come back to this post with a cup of tea in hand as it looks amazing. Flower fest later for me. Sinead x

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