April 22, 2013

spring flowers

It is very difficult to put into words the simple joy of picking the first blooms of the year from your patch of the earth without sounding hopelessly, helplessly mawkish. But, there it is, an ancient pleasure, that still delivers.


Spring is late, the first flowers are tiny and still few, but I'm cooing over them shamelessly, and showing them off at Jane's party like an over-zealous Victorian mama at a ball with her gaggle of marriageable daughters. May I introduce you?  Narcissi "Silver Chimes" and "Geranium", grape-hyacinth, cowslip and euphorbia.







The cowslips now grow under the trees in our garden - I collected the seed from plants in my parents' Norfolk garden, and when I see them blooming I think of that childhood garden, and my parents, and the wild marshy coast up there. Gardens become so full of connections and memories, gifts and inheritances...they just keep on giving.

Have a wonderful week. x

23 comments:

  1. Oh Belinda, I didn't expect to see you today I know you have/had a jewelry sale.

    So this is an unexpected thus very sweet post.

    And after reading so many British novels I finally get my first glimpse of cowslips.

    My day just keeps getting better.

    xo jane

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  2. Pleasure. Would hate to miss your flower party, Miss Jane!

    Didn't know that you don't have cowslips in the States - they grow wild in verges and meadows, pastures and often old church yards. They used to be so abundant all over England but shrinking grasslands mean shrinking numbers of cowslips, so I am keen to get my garden full of them! Bx

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  3. pretty, daffodils are one of my fav flowers because it means spring is here at last!!

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  4. I have a euphorbia/grape hyacinth mini vase of my own going on today - they are the perfect foil for each other. Do you sear yours to stop the milky sap coming out? I dipped mine in some boiling water, but not sure if that is the best way to treat them.

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  5. It does look enchanting Belinda! I haven't seen the cowslip in our pastures yet, but it is a pretty wild flower.

    Have a lovely new week!

    Madelief x

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  6. beautiful glorious wonders. thanks for posting them. cowslips..ahh something to dream about.

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  7. Is Spring late everywhere? I guess we're all closer than we thought. I too am in love with the cowslips...if only for their name alone.

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  8. oh i knew you'd have something beautiful. the hyacinth are magic. x

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  9. Your "girls" are just lovely and bound to attract many suiters. My aunt used to call primroses "cowslips", but now i see she was wrong. They dont grow here, either!

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  10. Dreamy and delicate, lovely spring. Wish I could smell them!

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  11. I'm with Jane. I've never seen a cowslip. I wish I had flowers from my garden to share! Your daffs ar sweet sweet.

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  12. Belinda... so very pretty and learned something new to boot! I have "googled" and found all sorts of interesting info about cowslips! No lovely cowslips here in the USA so enjoy for all of us... smiles to you!

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  13. Dear Belinda,

    I cannot tell you how much pleasure your words - and pictures too, of course - have given me this fine spring morning. Dare I say, a little shyly, that we speak the same language? Your style is unique and yet your words strike so many chords: the joy of aesthetics and history, a desire to play with names as well as attaching well-deserved personalities to your spring flowers.

    I am so very, very happy I dropped by.

    I wish you a wonderful week.

    Stephanie

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    Replies
    1. Stephanie, I feel the same way about your blog, thanks for dropping by, and for your kind words.

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  14. ps We live in the Touraine countryside and every year I am stunned by the plethora of cowslips, wild muscari, primroses... (the list is very long) which grow in our hedgerows.

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  15. Just love the tiny little flowers!!! I am also unfamiliar with cowslips but am totally enchanted by them and the other sprites of springs.

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  16. Dear Belinda,
    I agree with you- I feel quite passionate about picking posies from my garden. There is almost nothing else that gives me such constant pleasure. Feeling in touch with the seasons and the joy my flowers give me- your words and beautiful photographs sum it all up! Jane xx

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  17. Gorgeous...miss Cowslip you must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire you....

    Sarah -x-

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  18. Perfection!

    I have everything dug over for the dye garden here ... planting begins next week I hope :)

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  19. Think I will have to do a blogpost about cowslips! x

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